Archive for May 4th, 2010

NBA Playoff Preview: Lakers v. Jazz

WHAT’S THE DEAL? WHY ARE WE SEEING THIS BEFORE GAME 2 AND NOT GAME 1? Some of us have jobs.

YEAH, AND SOME OF US HAVE FULL-TIME JOBS: Uncool, man.

WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM GAME 1? Absolutely nothing. I didn’t see a minute of it. Although I suppose I “learned” that Deron Williams had no injury issues from the Denver series. So there’s that.

WE’VE SEEN THIS MATCHUP BEFORE: Yep. Third year in a row between the Lakers and Jazz, with LA winning in six in the second round in ’08 and in five in the first round in ’09.

SO LAKERS IN FOUR IN ’10? Not quite. I expect this to be every bit as close a series as the other Western Conference Semi and every bit as intense as LA’s first-rounder with Oklahoma City (which I nailed, by the way). This was probably as good a Jazz team as we’ve seen over the last four playoff seasons—before the injuries to Andrei Kirilenko and Mehmet Okur. If Kirilenko comes back during this series—as he hopes to do for Game 3—I can definitely see the Jazz making life difficult on the Lakers.

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A Solution To America’s Immigration Problem: Let Them All In

Immigration is one of those evergreen American political issues that never totally goes away and occasionally grows to such levels of intensity that it dominates the political landscape. Right now, the issue is in full bloom, with Arizona’s new Draconian immigration law and the new ad from Alabama gubernatorial candidate Tim James in which he declares, “We speak English. If you want to live here, learn it.”

Arizona’s law has some notable detractors, like President Obama on the left, and Jeb Bush on the right (although John McCain continued his new brand of despicable political cowardice by supporting it). Down in Alabama, Tim James seems like a long-shot to win the Republican nomination (although no new polls have come out since the “Language” ad). But this is by no means a fringe issue, or one that is likely to go away. Indeed, it’s possible that immigration inspires more fervent feelings than any other political issue, at least in border states.

In all the heated discussion of the issue, though, one important question doesn’t get raised nearly enough: Why are there any restrictions on immigration to the United States? Continue reading