Archive for the ‘Hindsight 2010’ Category

Hindsight 2010: Josh on The Best of Music

Much of the music I listened to this year was not from 2010, but there were plenty of standout tracks from this year. Below are my top five songs and top three albums of 2010:

Top Five Songs of 2010

5) “Deep Blue” — Arcade Fire

  • It may be a simpler song than many of the others on the The Suburbs, but Win Butler’s falsetto shines on this ballad, as does the acoustic guitar and violin play.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Hindsight 2010: John S on the Best of Music

I know what you’re thinking: “What the hell? Another Hindsight 2010 post? It’s January 27th!” Well, chill out, man, if you think it’s too late for a review then consider this incredibly premature nostalgia:

Top Ten Songs of 2010

10. “Hurricane J” — The Hold Steady


From an otherwise forgettable album, Craig Finn shows off his knack for guitar hooks and great melodies in a song that also features one of the band’s rare great vocal harmonies.

Continue reading

Hindsight 2010: The Year Derek Jeter Got Old

I was seven years old when Derek Jeter played his first game at shortstop for the New York Yankees—by the time his new contract ends I will be at least 26. It’s easy to gloss over those numbers at first because it seems like trivia, but it’s worth letting them sink in.

To put these facts in perspective, here is a brief list of things that have changed in my life over the course of time that Derek Jeter has been the starting shortstop for the New York Yankees: Everything.

I’m exaggerating, but only slightly. Fifteen years is a very long time. Continue reading

Hindsight 2010: Shots of the Year

It was a bad shot. That’s really where you have to start. It was pretty much indefensibly bad. Ali Farokhmanesh cannot plausibly argue that it was wise to take that three-pointer from the right wing with 37 seconds on the game clock, 30 on the shot clock, and his Northern Iowa Panthers up one on top-seeded and top-ranked Kansas.

Farokhmanesh had played an uneven game to that point. After a hot first half (4-for-4, 11 points), the UNI senior hadn’t scored since intermission. The Panthers, likewise, began leaking oil down the stretch. Solid for much of the afternoon, Northern Iowa struggled to get the ball past halfcourt against Kansas’ press. The Jayhawks found lanes for layups and putbacks. A double-digit lead was trimmed to one, and it seemed Kansas would have, at worst, a chance to tie with its next possession.

Continue reading

The Best Book of 2010: Paul Murray’s “Skippy Dies”

“We’re too old

We’re not old at all.”

“Bear,” The Antlers

In the opening scene of Skippy Dies, in which the climactic and eponymous action of Paul Murray’s novel occurs on the floor of Ed’s Doughnut House, Daniel “Skippy” Juster attempts to scribble, with jelly as his ink, his final message to the world. “Tell Lori” is all he manages, but the intention seems clear. “Tell Lori you love her? Is that it?” his friend Ruprecht asks desperately, and Skippy exhales, smiles, and passes away.

Set in Seabrook, a fictional all-boys’ Irish secondary school, Murray’s second novel is best described as an attempt to fill in the blanks—those left by Skippy’s final message (was his final smile an affirmation of Ruprecht’s clichéd hypothesis or simply an acceptance of his death?), by his death, by lives that don’t correlate to the expected narrative arcs we seek, and by this quizzical and evolving universe around us. How exactly do we explain ourselves? Indeed, Murray quickly makes an analogy between the Big Bang and puberty: “[E]verything that is, everything that has ever been…all crammed into one dimensionless point where no rules or laws apply, waiting to fly out and become the future,” in the words of Ruprecht.

Continue reading

Hindsight 2010: Top Five Most Memorable Episodes of TV

5. “God,” Louie

One of the reasons the superlative in the title of this post is “memorable” and not “best” is to make room for episodes like “God.” It wasn’t the funniest episode of the first season of Louie—and it wasn’t even necessarily my favorite—but it was certainly the most distinct and memorable episode of a show that was consistently original. I remember watching the scene in which the creepy, nameless doctor tells a young Louie to stab Jesus Christ in the wrist and thinking, “It’s very unusual that this is on television.” The dark humor, the nuanced take on religion, and the controversial point of view are all things rarely seen on TV, and yet they were precisely the kinds of things that made Louie such an innovative and enjoyable show. Continue reading

Hindsight 2010: John Paul Stevens, Retiree of the Year

Hindsight 20/10– Over the next few days, we will be reflecting on the past year in a series of posts. Josh begins with the Retiree of the Year:

Since 2005, Supreme Court Justices Rehnquist, O’Connor, Souter, and most recently, Stevens departed from their coveted positions on the bench. As a law student, I read a lot of legal opinions by justices of the Supreme Court and federal circuit courts. The judge’s name is generally listed before the text of the opinion and naturally, some judges excite me more than others. I know I’m going to get a well-written opinion with Justice Scalia, an intellectually stimulating economic analysis of some aspect of the law under the guise of an opinion with Seventh Circuit Judge Richard Posner, and a witty, brilliant analysis with Ninth Circuit Chief Judge Alex Kozinski.* Only a handful of other justices’ names alone get me excited for an opinion: Of the Court’s four most recent retirees, Justice Stevens is the only one who fits into this class.

*He also showed his wit on The Dating Game (second contestant).

Continue reading