Posts Tagged ‘All-Star Game’

Monday Medley

What we read while not going easy on Derek Jeter…

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The Sports Revolution: Fixing the All-Star Game

In preparation for this year’s Fall Classic, we asked Pierre Menard if he would be interested in revising his plans from last season on how to fix Major League Baseball’s All-Star Game. “Revise???” Pierre responded indignantly. “What revisions are needed? Fine, change the moronic number of current All-Stars from 32 per side to 34 and we’re done.” We didn’t even go that far. Here, unrevised and from last season, is Pierre on, well, revising the All-Star Game.

Let me set the scene for you: It’s an All-Star Game, and nobody cares.

Let me reset the scene for you: It’s an All-Star Game, and everybody cares.

My esteemed colleague wrote a vapid, nonsensical, and generally tedious post on why the Major League Baseball All-Star Game isn’t that bad. But John S, let’s be honest with ourselves and call a spade a spade. What fan of baseball is actually going to subject themselves to the abject torture that is the All-Star Game? I challenge you, John S, to sit there through the interminable player introductions, ceremonial first pitches, shots of Bud Selig, and not least in inducing woe, the actual four-hour game, and come out on the other side of it thinking yourself somehow enhanced by the experience.

A confession: I have not watched an All-Star Game in its entirety; this is because I have a sense of propriety. I did monitor bits and pieces of last year’s, which proved mildly interesting. But suffice it to say that, each year, Major League Baseball errs more in its All-Star shenanigans than Daniel Uggla.

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The Sports Revolution: Fixing the All-Star Game

Let me set the scene for you: It’s an All-Star Game, and nobody cares.

Let me reset the scene for you: It’s an All-Star Game, and everybody cares.

My esteemed colleague wrote a vapid, nonsensical, and generally tedious post on why the Major League Baseball All-Star Game isn’t that bad. But John S, let’s be honest with ourselves and call a spade a spade. What fan of baseball is actually going to subject themselves to the abject torture that is the All-Star Game? I challenge you, John S, to sit there through the interminable player introductions, ceremonial first pitches, shots of Bud Selig, and not least in inducing woe, the actual four-hour game, and come out on the other side of it thinking yourself somehow enhanced by the experience.

A confession: I have not watched an All-Star Game in its entirety; this is because I have a sense of propriety. I did monitor bits and pieces of last year’s, which proved mildly interesting. But suffice it to say that, each year, Major League Baseball errs more in its All-Star shenanigans than Daniel Uggla.

Continue reading

Ease Off the All-Star Game

The MLB All-Star Game is next week. I generally find All-Star Games of any sport relentlessly boring. A hodgepodge of very good players united for one game seems to contradict most of the basic tenets of a sporting philosophy: team consistency, sustained competitiveness, varying levels of talent, etc.

Apparently I am in the minority, because every year every team sport in America has one. And they seem popular.

(The only thing more perplexing to me than the popularity of All-Star Games is the popularity of the Home Run Derby. It seems like what is impressive about home runs is that they are hit in game scenarios against pitchers who are not trying to give up home runs, none of which is true in a Home Run Derby. The Home Run Derby seems like it should be an event in the World’s Strongest Man.)

I do concede that the All-Star Game makes for good discussions. Every year we get to argue over who got selected undeservedly, who got snubbed, etc.

And every year someone complains about how the All-Star Game decides which league will get home-field advantage in the World Series. This is, for many people, the worst tragedy since Rwanda. Yet, despite my almost total aversion to All-Star Games in general, it makes total sense to me. Continue reading