Posts Tagged ‘boy meets world’

Mere Anachrony: Boy Meets World

Boy Meets World

Boy Meets World

Girl Meets World, the Disney Channel’s long-awaited Boy Meets World spin-off, premiers tonight. Except it’s not Disney’s typical audience of pre-teens who are awaiting this premiere—it’s people in their 20s who have been clamoring the loudest for this show about an eleven-year-old girl. And why? Because we millennials fucking love Boy Meets World.

For those unfamiliar, Boy Meets World aired on ABC from 1993 to 2000, as part of the network’s “TGIF” lineup of family-friendly programming. The titular boy was Cory Matthews (played by Ben Savage). He was in sixth grade when the series began. His parents were happily married. He had an older brother (Eric, played by Will Friedle) and a younger sister (Morgan, played brilliantly by Lily Nicksay, then forgettably by Lindsay Ridgeway). His best friend was Shawn Hunter (Rider Strong) and the object of his affections was Topanga Lawrence (Danielle Fishel). Most important, though, was his next-door neighbor and perpetual teacher, Mr. Feeny (William Daniels), who was the show’s voice of reason and guiding light.

But all that sounds pretty cookie-cutter. It doesn’t really capture the enduring appeal of Boy Meets World. So what does? What accounts for the enthusiasm for Cory and Topanga’s return? Continue reading

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A Problem with Series Finales

The Office Finale

In case you somehow missed it, The Office aired its series finale last week. Now, I’m on the record with my problems with that show, and fans seemed to like the finale a lot, so I won’t rain on their parade with my criticisms of it. But it brought to mind a problem I have with series finales in general: It really bothers me when characters in TV finales act like they know they’re in a TV finale.

This is a very common problem, especially with comedies. Plot-driven shows can spend their finales concluding whatever series-long arcs it has been developing: (Spoilers) The Sopranos settled Tony’s war with New York, Battlestar Galactica found “Earth,” Lost explained the Island (kind of), etc. But shows that are more character-driven end up filling the time with a lot of “finale talk.” Continue reading

Monday Medley

What we read while tripping over the power cord at the Superdome…

Monday Medley

What we read while debating the merits of Spandau Ballet…

Monday Medley

What we read while watching Bin Laden watch himself…

In Search of the Great College Drama

It seems an obvious question: How come no good television shows have been made about the American college experience? Tonight, NBC debuts Community, a hitherto critically regarded comedy about a diverse group of community college students—few of whom are actually of college age. By my count, it’s the third major television show set at a college, and the other two are Felicity and Undeclared, so you know how loosely I’m using “major.”*

*It’s very possible I’ve forgotten another show, but believe me, I thought about it for a long time.

While the college landscape has been neglected, there has been nothing short of a plethora of high school dramas. Beverly Hills 90210 appears to have started the trend, with shows such as Dawson’s Creek, Freaks and Geeks, Gilmore Girls, The O.C., One Tree Hill, Friday Night Lights, Veronica Mars, and Gossip Girl following suit. On the other end of the spectrum, there have been a number of comedies about 20-something singles, most notably Friends and How I Met Your Mother.

Continue reading