Posts Tagged ‘Damon Lindelof’

Monday Medley

What we read while Tiger Woods also lost at the Teen Choice Awards…

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Monday Medley

What we read while narrowly avoiding an NPI shutdown…

Monday Medley

What we read while our goals were mysteriously disallowed…

Getting Lost (Redux): The Life And Death Of Jeremy Bentham

John Locke is a very intriguing and unusual TV character. Before I started watching Lost, when my only real exposure to the show were the promos and the summaries I got from my AP Calculus teacher (who was the first real Lost fan I knew and, come to think of it, kind of like Locke), I remember thinking it was very strange that this new television phenomenon had, as one of its central characters, a rather elderly, bald gentleman.*

*It’s very strange to think back to my perception of Lost before I started watching—which was fairly recently. For a while, I wasn’t even sure of the characters’ names. At various points I thought Lost featured a character named “Jack Locke,” that Locke was the first name of Matthew Fox’s character, and that “John Locke” and “Jack” were in fact the same person (since “Jack” is often considered a nickname for “John”**). It’s worth remembering that this is how Lost is perceived by those on the outside of this “cultural phenomenon.”

**Although how you can have a nickname that is the same length, in both syllables and letters, as the actual name is another question. Continue reading

Getting Lost: Across the Sea

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

OK, Question #1: How is it possible that this guy STILL doesn’t have a name? (shaking my head) I don’t know…. I don’t know.

I suppose I should give up any hope of him ever getting a name, right? Well, if he were going to get one, this would seem like the episode for him to get it. I think Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse probably think being nameless is intimidating.We’re probably stuck with “Man in Black” (or Flocke, or Smokey, or the Smoke Monster, or Esau, or Blackie, or any of the other nicknames he’s acquired over the last year) for good.

At least his mother took the trouble of color-coding him from birth, right? Yeah, that was awfully nice of her.

Should we talk about the episode now? Continue reading

Getting Lost: The Package

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

So, could you figure out who “the package” was before it was revealed? I think anyone who watched could have figured out, as soon as Charles Widmore said the package wasn’t “a what” but “a who,” that A) the package’s identity wouldn’t be revealed until the end of the episode; and B) that the package was almost certainly Desmond Hume. There was even a good chance it was Desmond before Widmore declared that his package was a person. After all, we pretty much know where all the other characters are and what they are doing at this point in the season, whereas Desmond showed up for about eight seconds in the season premiere and then disappeared.

Well, it could have been someone like Walt, or Jack’s ex-wife, or someone new, or someone coming back from the dead. Continue reading

Lost Season Six and the Importance of The End

“It always ends the same.”

“It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

—Jacob and the unidentified Man In Black, from the Season Five finale of Lost

The sixth and final season of Lost kicks off tonight, in what is likely the most anticipated final season since at least the end of The Sopranos. It’s conceivable that Lost is actually more anticipated than The Sopranos final season. For one, more people watch Lost, since it’s on a network and not premium cable.

But it’s not simply the number of viewers the show has, it’s the type of viewership the show inspires: There are no passive Lost fans. You cannot just check in every few weeks to see where the characters are—you will be totally fucking confused. The show is so deeply enmeshed in mystery and ambiguity that missing any steps in the narrative will get you completely lost. This is also what makes the show so addicting. Continue reading