Posts Tagged ‘Hurley’

Monday Medley

What we read while deleting our unfortunately phrased tweets…

Getting Lost (Redux): The Incident

One of the raison d’etres of “Getting Lost (Redux)” has been to help see how Lost got from where it was to where it is now. “The Incident” is critical to that on a very basic level, having triggered Season Six’s controversial and polarizing Sideways stories. It is also critical on a more complex story level, having been the first episode to introduce us to Jacob, in all his splendor.

“The Incident” opens with a scene, which I feel like I’ve linked to a dozen times already but here’s one more, that fundamentally changed the tenor of the series. Not only did it confirm that Jacob was in fact real (it’s almost hard to believe that this was ever in doubt), but it also introduced us to the Man in Black. This was the first real indication that Jacob had a rival, and was not the sole entity of power on the Island. The final season has made clear that the characters were brought to the Island as part of a power struggle between Jacob and the Man in Black—a struggle that will ultimately end with Jacob’s death. Continue reading

Getting Lost: Everybody Loves Hugo

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

Oh man, how excited were you to see Libby again? I know a lot of people were anxiously awaiting her return, and I hope for those people that it was everything they hoped for and more, but I didn’t really care. As I said when the season started, if they had gone through the whole season without addressing her character at all, I wouldn’t have minded.

But you were at least happy for Hurley, right? He got to see Libby again! Last week, after the exceptionally well-received “Happily Ever After,” I was talking to a fellow Lost fan as we shared our enthusiasm about the episode. One worry he had, though, was that the series would devolve into a sappy “love conquers all” message. After all, Charlie and Desmond were only drawn to the existence of the parallel universes once they realized that their respective soulmates were there.

Last night in “Everybody Loves Hugo,” we pick up where we left off. Continue reading

Getting Lost: Ab Aeterno

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

Well, let’s start with the obvious: What exactly does “Ab Aeterno”—the title of last night’s episode—mean? Come on, you can’t Google it? Apparently, it can be loosely translated as “from the beginning of time,” “from eternity,” “from the everlasting,” etc. Basically, it means some shit is really, really old, as we discover in this episode that Richard Alpert has looked more or less the same for over 140 years.

Speaking of which, were people really still calling America “the New World” in 1867? I mean, the United States was pushing 100 at that point, and Europe had known about the continent for almost four centuries… Yeah, that part of the episode didn’t ring all that true to me. On the whole, I was a little wary of the entire Canary Island part of Richard’s story. Richard is an important character in terms of the Island’s overall mythology—and he’s almost always a good addition to a scene or episode, despite not always getting a lot of chances to shine, as he did two weeks ago in his dynamite scene—but he’s not really a character at the emotional center of the story. We didn’t meet him until Season Three, and we didn’t know much about his character until, really, this season.

And, unlike a lot of viewers, I really wasn’t especially interested in the whole “Richard doesn’t age” phenomenon. I didn’t really need a whole episode devoted to explaining it, since the supernatural is such an ingrained part of Lost by now. So centering an entire episode around Richard—with pretty much none of the main characters—was a rather bold move. People generally hated an episode like “The Other 48 Days” from Season Two for the same reason. Continue reading