Posts Tagged ‘Jacob’

Getting Lost (Redux): The Incident

One of the raison d’etres of “Getting Lost (Redux)” has been to help see how Lost got from where it was to where it is now. “The Incident” is critical to that on a very basic level, having triggered Season Six’s controversial and polarizing Sideways stories. It is also critical on a more complex story level, having been the first episode to introduce us to Jacob, in all his splendor.

“The Incident” opens with a scene, which I feel like I’ve linked to a dozen times already but here’s one more, that fundamentally changed the tenor of the series. Not only did it confirm that Jacob was in fact real (it’s almost hard to believe that this was ever in doubt), but it also introduced us to the Man in Black. This was the first real indication that Jacob had a rival, and was not the sole entity of power on the Island. The final season has made clear that the characters were brought to the Island as part of a power struggle between Jacob and the Man in Black—a struggle that will ultimately end with Jacob’s death. Continue reading

Getting Lost: What They Died For

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

Wait, is this a Redux post or a real one? It’s the real thing baby!

Good. It’s too early to start reminiscing anyway. Well, I don’t know about that, but there are definitely pressing matters to discuss from “What They Died For.”

Yeah, like: What do you get when you burn ashes? Obvs you get slightly smaller ashes. Continue reading

Getting Lost: The Candidate

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

So, it looks like Jack figured it out. Did he? Well, it depends what you mean by “it,” but it certainly felt like those lines Jack was spitting out as he desperately tried to talk Sawyer out of defusing the bomb were important. For one, he flatly declared, “Locke can’t kill us.” This, of course, echoes the boy’s claim from back in “The Substitute,” but this was the first time the prohibition has been extended to all the candidates. This might raise some issues, since the Smoke Monster has previously been a killing machine, taking down the pilot, Mr. Eko, Bram (Jacob’s bodyguard), and pretty much Widmore’s entire camp earlier in this very episode. The loophole to this, of course, is to assume that those victims had either never been candidates (like the pilot) or ceased to be candidates (like Eko).

If the Smoke Monster can’t kill the candidates, then what is he doing with them? According to Jack, his goal is to get them all to kill each other. As many have speculated, the Man in Black cannot leave the Island until all the candidates are dead, but he himself cannot kill them.* As a result, he has to wait for the candidates to slowly kill each other—something they have been pretty good at now for 100+ episodes. Continue reading

Getting Lost: Everybody Loves Hugo

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

Oh man, how excited were you to see Libby again? I know a lot of people were anxiously awaiting her return, and I hope for those people that it was everything they hoped for and more, but I didn’t really care. As I said when the season started, if they had gone through the whole season without addressing her character at all, I wouldn’t have minded.

But you were at least happy for Hurley, right? He got to see Libby again! Last week, after the exceptionally well-received “Happily Ever After,” I was talking to a fellow Lost fan as we shared our enthusiasm about the episode. One worry he had, though, was that the series would devolve into a sappy “love conquers all” message. After all, Charlie and Desmond were only drawn to the existence of the parallel universes once they realized that their respective soulmates were there.

Last night in “Everybody Loves Hugo,” we pick up where we left off. Continue reading

Getting Lost: The Package

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

So, could you figure out who “the package” was before it was revealed? I think anyone who watched could have figured out, as soon as Charles Widmore said the package wasn’t “a what” but “a who,” that A) the package’s identity wouldn’t be revealed until the end of the episode; and B) that the package was almost certainly Desmond Hume. There was even a good chance it was Desmond before Widmore declared that his package was a person. After all, we pretty much know where all the other characters are and what they are doing at this point in the season, whereas Desmond showed up for about eight seconds in the season premiere and then disappeared.

Well, it could have been someone like Walt, or Jack’s ex-wife, or someone new, or someone coming back from the dead. Continue reading

Getting Lost: Ab Aeterno

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

Well, let’s start with the obvious: What exactly does “Ab Aeterno”—the title of last night’s episode—mean? Come on, you can’t Google it? Apparently, it can be loosely translated as “from the beginning of time,” “from eternity,” “from the everlasting,” etc. Basically, it means some shit is really, really old, as we discover in this episode that Richard Alpert has looked more or less the same for over 140 years.

Speaking of which, were people really still calling America “the New World” in 1867? I mean, the United States was pushing 100 at that point, and Europe had known about the continent for almost four centuries… Yeah, that part of the episode didn’t ring all that true to me. On the whole, I was a little wary of the entire Canary Island part of Richard’s story. Richard is an important character in terms of the Island’s overall mythology—and he’s almost always a good addition to a scene or episode, despite not always getting a lot of chances to shine, as he did two weeks ago in his dynamite scene—but he’s not really a character at the emotional center of the story. We didn’t meet him until Season Three, and we didn’t know much about his character until, really, this season.

And, unlike a lot of viewers, I really wasn’t especially interested in the whole “Richard doesn’t age” phenomenon. I didn’t really need a whole episode devoted to explaining it, since the supernatural is such an ingrained part of Lost by now. So centering an entire episode around Richard—with pretty much none of the main characters—was a rather bold move. People generally hated an episode like “The Other 48 Days” from Season Two for the same reason. Continue reading

Getting Lost: Recon

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

Oh, so you finally got around to reviewing this week’s episode of Lost? Look, it’s NCAA Tournament time. That takes precedent. I mean, did you see yesterday’s games?

Given your record in yesterday’s action (6-10, four Sweet 16 teams out), why should we take anything you say about Lost seriously? Well, I’m not really saying you should, but I don’t know if there is any significant correlation between March Madness picks and Lost analysis.

They both involve predictions based on careful, deliberate analysis that end up completely negated by what appears to be random nonsense… Good point.

OK, can we please talk about something besides the NCAA Tournament for once? Ugh. Fine. Continue reading

Getting Lost: Dr. Linus

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

So, were you expecting Ben to die? I was, mainly because of the declaration in last week’s previews that this episode would see him “meet his demise.” So even after he ostensibly made peace with Ilana, I was half-expecting him to die some other way, either because Ilana had been lying, someone at the beach still harbored resentment at him (and let’s face it: pretty much everyone has a reason to kill Ben), or through some freak accident. After all, this show does have a history of jerking the audience around and fake-out endings.

I bet you were happy that he didn’t die, though, am I right? Of course. Ben is one of the most compelling characters on the show—why wouldn’t you keep him around? At the same time, this episode felt like kind of a waste. The main theme—Ben’s guilt over Alex’s death—was already dealt with in last season’s “Dead Is Dead,” and there wasn’t a whole lot of new stuff on that front: He still can’t forgive himself, and he still wants the Island to give him a chance to redeem himself. Continue reading

Getting Lost: Sundown

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

Wrong again, John, wrong again… How do you mean, exactly?

Well, for one, you predicted this week’s episode would be about Sun/Jin. Yeah, I was wrong about that, and I knew it ahead of time. I still think my reasoning made sense, though.

And you said Dogen would survive. Yeah, well, er, whoops. I did say that I didn’t think Locke 2.0 or Claire would kill him, so I was right on that one. Who knew that Sayid, the resurrected Iraqi torturer who had “a darkness growing in him,” would end up siding with Locke 2.0? Who could have seen that one coming?

And you thought Locke 2.0 wasn’t necessarily the Bad Guy, and now he’s slaughtering people by the dozens again. Look, I made some mistakes, OK? Chill out, nobody’s perfect.

Continue reading

Getting Lost: Lighthouse

Ah....good times

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

So, do you think Jack “has what it takes”? Well, I’ve never been one of the many Lost fans who hates Jack. For the first two or three seasons, he was my favorite character on the show, since he often struck me as the only person on the Island who was rational, prudent, and not totally self-involved. Granted, he’s given to frustrating fits of stubbornness, like when he shattered Jacob’s mirror in last night’s episode, as opposed to waiting patiently to see what exactly the mission he and Hurley had been sent on was all about. But more often, Jack has done what it takes to keep survivors alive. It was Jack, after all, who coined “Live Together, Die Alone,” and it was Jack who found the drinking water, and it was Jack who saved Charlie, and it was Jack who helped spring Sawyer and Kate from the Others, etc. He fails just as often as he succeeds, and his failings are more memorable—like in his unyielding but doomed efforts to save Boone in Season One—but he always goes down swinging. This is what makes Jack both tragic and noble. Continue reading