Posts Tagged ‘James Ford’

A Word of Advice to Environmental Advocates: Stop Saying “Game Over”

It’s not helping…

The phrase “Game Over” has recurred several times over the last few months when scientists talk about the environment: Most famously, James Hansen of NASA said it about the potential impact of the Keystone pipeline; recently, Jane C.S. Long told The New Yorker that it would be “game over” if Arctic permafrost started to melt; the phrase has appeared in headlines and op-eds about seemingly every environmental issue.

I’m not sure if one scientist said it first, and everyone else thought it sounded cool, or if some liberal Frank Luntz-type sent some memo about the phrase to environmental advocates everywhere, or if it’s just a coincidence. Either why, though, they should really stop, for at least six reasons:

 

1) Saying “Game Over” makes you sound like you are talking about a video game Continue reading

Getting Lost: What They Died For

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

Wait, is this a Redux post or a real one? It’s the real thing baby!

Good. It’s too early to start reminiscing anyway. Well, I don’t know about that, but there are definitely pressing matters to discuss from “What They Died For.”

Yeah, like: What do you get when you burn ashes? Obvs you get slightly smaller ashes. Continue reading

Getting Lost: Recon

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

Oh, so you finally got around to reviewing this week’s episode of Lost? Look, it’s NCAA Tournament time. That takes precedent. I mean, did you see yesterday’s games?

Given your record in yesterday’s action (6-10, four Sweet 16 teams out), why should we take anything you say about Lost seriously? Well, I’m not really saying you should, but I don’t know if there is any significant correlation between March Madness picks and Lost analysis.

They both involve predictions based on careful, deliberate analysis that end up completely negated by what appears to be random nonsense… Good point.

OK, can we please talk about something besides the NCAA Tournament for once? Ugh. Fine. Continue reading