Posts Tagged ‘Milgram experiment’

Real World/Road Rules Challenge: Rivals II, Week 4 Power Rankings

C.T. and Wes

“Ketchup is legitimately my biggest fear.” –Jemmye

 

“Someone’s gonna die tonight. This Jungle’s going to be awesome.” —C.T.

 

What is the point of watching these episodes if MTV isn’t going to send anyone home in them? Don’t they know I have better things to do?*

*I have nothing better to do.

The early departure of Sarah/Trishelle last week meant MTV had to adjust on the fly, so as not to lose too many girls too early. And I at least have to hand it to the producers for using the situation to conduct their own little Milgram Experiment on the cast—even though several players suspected that the hypothetical Jungle might result in death, nobody batted an eye and letting Jasmine/Theresa or Cooke/Cara Maria do it. Most of them even seemed excited, even as TJ refused to guarantee their safety.

Just a reminder: These people can vote. Continue reading

Compliance and Personal Responsibility

NOTE: This review contains spoilers for Compliance. Though the film is based on real events, if you are not familiar with the real events or the film, I strongly advise seeing the film before reading this or anything else about the film’s plot.

One of the most resonant scenes in Craig Zobel’s powerful new film, Compliance, comes near the end, when Becky (played by Dreama Walker), the fast-food cashier who has been falsely accused, stripped, imprisoned, and raped, wants someone to pay for her ordeal. She tells a lawyer she wants to sue her boss, Sandra. But that’s not the best course of action, says the lawyer. What’s the use in suing a now-unemployed fast-food manager? It makes much more sense to sue the chain where you worked: It will have much deeper pockets and, besides, wasn’t it really the company’s fault, for not having proper guidelines for this type of situation?

This rationale represents a perfect conclusion to the film, which is largely about how people absolve themselves of responsibility by submitting to authority and, moreover, how society tends to reward and condition this behavior. Compliance opens with a small but revealing scene: Sandra (played by Ann Dowd) has to get an emergency delivery after someone left the freezer door open the night before, but the delivery guy chews her out for not telling her supervisor first. “I thought I would deal with this first,” she explains, “I don’t know what I was thinking.” Continue reading