Posts Tagged ‘n+1’

Monday Medley

What we read while Pussy Riot got legitimately raped…

Monday Medley

What we read while jokingly telling Billy Donovan he outcoached us:


  • Some absolute gangbusters college basketball journalism in the wake of a riveting weekend (and this is before seeing what the scribes have to say about VCU). The best of the bunch might be Luke Winn’s behind-the-scenes look at Butler, which includes yet another quote that makes everyone — us included — swoon over Brad Stevens: “Stevens stood on the court on Saturday night and someone asked him if what the Bulldogs just accomplished was unbelievable. ‘Believable is a better term,’ he said. ‘It’s a more positive term, it makes you live life a little bit better, it makes you a bit more thankful for the opportunities and take advantage of them.'”
  • Kyle Whelliston takes down the RPI! The fight is not lost! (We wonder if Kyle’s head is going to explode with a mid-major national semifinal on Saturday.)
  • We forget if we gave the official thumbs-up to Quickish already, but if not, here it is. Best thing to have open during Tourney games or really any sporting event.

Monday Medley

What we read while letting go…

  • Sure, it was cool of Mikhail Prokhorov to handpick a blogger to sit down with for one of his first American interviews. But, we can’t help but feel a little spurned. I mean, Tim loves the Nets!
  • Our favorite Canadian magazine’s June cover story explores the shifting ownership of hockey and asks if Canada can really claim the NHL as its own after the league has expanded into the American sunbelt. It’s an interesting read on how the differences between how Canadians and Americans view hockey stand for the country’s larger distinctions: “Americans, on the other hand, do not need to worry about something as abstruse as the dignity of hockey. They may not have hockey in their DNA, as advertisers keep telling us we do, but this gives them the enormous advantage of being able to assess hockey without their view being obscured by the claptrap of national identity that so confounds the Canadian perspective.”