Posts Tagged ‘noam chomsky’

Monday Medley

What we read while going undrafted yet again…

Monday Medley

What we read after knocking out Manny Pacquiao…

Monday Medley

What we read while asking Bob Costas his thoughts on the fiscal cliff…

Monday Medley

What we read while strategically placing our infield flies…

  • The San Francisco Weekly explains how Bleacher Report — home to, without hyperbole, the trashiest, most nonsensical sports “articles” on the web — grew to be worth $200 million.
  • The New York film locations of North by Northwest, then and now.

Monday Medley

What we read while they protested Mark Zuckerberg’s wedding in Chicago…

Monday Medley

What we read while Rush Limbaugh called us way worse stuff…

Monday Medley

What we read while wondering what the original Holy Saturday was like…


Aught Lang Syne: The Decade in Nonfiction, Part II

In case you missed Part I of our analysis of the decade’s best nonfiction, you can check it out here.

9/11, Pirates and Emperors, Hegemony or Survival, Failed States, et. al. – Noam Chomsky

Noam Chomsky has always been prolific in his political writings, but the aftermath of 9/11 saw an increase in the relevance of his criticisms of American foreign policy. As an unabashed radical and critic of American interventionism, Chomsky’s writings express points of view that are virtually unrepresented in the mainstream discourse. For those who agree and those who disagree, Chomsky represents important challenges to American foreign policy that need to be addressed, given the country’s ongoing role in violent global affairs.

–John S

Moneyball - Michael Lewis

Michael Lewis is arguably the best nonfiction writer of the Aughts, and Moneyball is one of the best nonfiction books of the Aughts. Lewis made Billy Beane and sabermetrics (i.e. baseball statistical analysis) into a superstar and super-method. No other book has had as much effect on the general management of a sport than Moneyball has had on baseball. OPS shifted from undervalued to properly or even overvalued (and, you know what’s next) and teams continued to hire Art Howe (well, that wasn’t a good thing). More than simply chronicling Beane’s (general) managerial philosophy, Lewis extracted meaningful themes from it such as capitalism’s push for efficiency as reflected in baseball and overcoming the deleterious effects of dogmatic insiders.

–Josh

Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 109 other followers