Posts Tagged ‘pete thamel’

Monday Medley

What we read while jokingly telling Billy Donovan he outcoached us:


  • Some absolute gangbusters college basketball journalism in the wake of a riveting weekend (and this is before seeing what the scribes have to say about VCU). The best of the bunch might be Luke Winn’s behind-the-scenes look at Butler, which includes yet another quote that makes everyone — us included — swoon over Brad Stevens: “Stevens stood on the court on Saturday night and someone asked him if what the Bulldogs just accomplished was unbelievable. ‘Believable is a better term,’ he said. ‘It’s a more positive term, it makes you live life a little bit better, it makes you a bit more thankful for the opportunities and take advantage of them.'”
  • Kyle Whelliston takes down the RPI! The fight is not lost! (We wonder if Kyle’s head is going to explode with a mid-major national semifinal on Saturday.)
  • We forget if we gave the official thumbs-up to Quickish already, but if not, here it is. Best thing to have open during Tourney games or really any sporting event.
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Monday Medley

What we read while deleting our unfortunately phrased tweets…

The Double Bonus: An Eye for an Eye

Tim in black; John in red.

As we approach Selection Sunday, we’re inundated with various criteria to whittle down to the most deserving 65 teams.* There’s the record, RPI, records against the RPI top 50, strength of schedule, and of course, the “Eye Test.”

*It is NOT the best 65; it is the most deserving 65.

I hate the Eye Test.

The Eye Test works neither theoretically nor practically. In what other aspects of life is the Eye Test appropriate?

You may not have made the right diagnosis, but you looked like you  knew what you were doing. Congratulations, Doc, you’ve passed my Eye Test.

The Eye Test is college basketball’s equivalent of Josh’s beloved Handwriting Effect. It’s a way to impose overly subjective measures into a process that should limit subjectivity as much as possible. And while the Selection Committee is subjective, it’s subjective within objective boundaries. By this I mean the Committee applies a subjective weight to objective measures. They may prioritize overall and conference records differently, but those records are set. It’s not like someone’s saying, “Well, Seton Hall looks more like a 22-9 team instead of 19-12 in my book.” Continue reading