Posts Tagged ‘the future of the supreme court’

Aught Lang Syne: What Josh Is Looking Forward To Next Decade

In a three part conclusion to Aught Lang Syne, we at NPI turn our attention away from the past and towards the future. Josh presents what he’s looking forward to in the Teens. Tim and John S’s posts on the matter will follow this afternoon.

In the Teens, I am looking forward to…


…The Next Film that Charlie Kaufman Writes and Directs: Charlie Kaufman (who looks kind of like Malcolm Gladwell, doesn’t he?) wrote arguably the best film of the Aughts, despite what John S doesn’t have to say. Being John Malkovich, a great film too, just missed the Aughts, and he wrote the screenplay for Confessions of a Dangerous Mind, one of the better films of the Aughts. And, Adaptation ain’t too shabby either. Wired has rightly pegged Kaufman as Hollywood’s brainiest screenwriter, and the themes and developments in his movies force you to consider and reconsider psychological and cognitive scientific assumptions. And, he seems to have a knack for generating excellent acting performances (see Sam Rockwell in Confessions, Jim Carrey in Eternal Sunshine, and Catherine Keener in Being John Malkovich, among others).   Kaufman wrote one film this decade—Synecdoche, NYwhich tried very hard to be groundbreaking and innovative but unfortunately bordered on incomprehensibility. But, Kaufman is too talented not to try again and it may just result in one of the best movies of the Teens.

…Whether Lacrosse Becomes a Major Sport: I’m finally reading The Tipping Point, which has gotten me thinking about what’s going to tip in a variety of domains. Of course, much of tipping is due to luck—though not arbitrary luck—which is why I’m so intrigued about whether lacrosse is going to become a major sport. Bill Simmons implies that it is going to tip soon, largely because it’s a safer sport than football. If it does, this would be the first time a sport—not initially major—has became a major sport in a VERY long time, arguably since basketball in the 1950s. Although, I sincerely hope it doesn’t come at the expense of football, which has become in recent years, unquestionably, my favorite sport to watch.
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