Posts Tagged ‘the Others’

Getting Lost (Redux): Through The Looking Glass

So when did you catch on? “Through the Looking Glass” is probably the most pivotal episode in Lost’s history—the point where the question changed from who these people had been to where these people were going. We open on Jack—a bearded Jack—on a plane, heading back to Los Angeles. It’s a familiar feeling, of course, but something is different, and not just facial hair.

No, we’ve jumped three years into the future, and now we’re not just seeing a Jack dealing with spinal surgeries, divorces, and bad dads—we see a Jack who is permanently scarred from what went down on the Island. After the flight attendant gives him a newspaper instead of a drink, he sees something—which we later find out is an obituary—that causes him to drive to an overpass with the intention of jumping off. Before he brings himself to jump, though, a car crashes nearby, and Jack’s hero-complex kicks in, as he saves the victims. Continue reading

Getting Lost (Redux): Live Together, Die Alone

For a while after I first watched “Live Together, Die Alone,” the second season finale, it was my favorite episode of Lost. On a second complete viewing: Not so much.

It’s not that “Live Together, Die Alone” is bad, but on the heels of “Exodus” it feels a little slight as a finale. Also, compared to later season finales, this one is not really the game-changer it felt like at the time.

The best thing about “Live Together, Die Alone” is the first full inclusion of Desmond. Desmond was of course introduced back in the Season Two premiere, but we learned little about him, aside from the facts that he was Scottish, he likes to say “brotha,” and he pushes a button. His return in this episode—and the shot in which he first appears, with Jack staring down into cabin of Desmond’s boat, was a nice callback to the end of Season One, with Jack staring down into Desmond’s hatch—is both surprising and fitting. Continue reading

Getting Lost (Redux): Lockdown

“Getting Lost (Redux)” has jumped way ahead, to the 17th episode of the second season, “Lockdown.” Why the big jump? To combine the two most compelling threads of Season Two: the mystery of the hatch and the identity of Henry Gale. Along with the introduction of the tail-section survivors, these two threads represented the crux of Season Two.

As I said yesterday, the hatch was the main cliffhanger at the end of Season One, and the first few episodes of Season Two deal directly with it: We meet Desmond, find out one use of The Numbers, and learn why the button must be pushed every 108 minutes. Jack and Locke have an intense confrontation over whether or not to push the button, but then Desmond disappears and the button becomes a kind of white noise for most of the season. It’s always there to be pushed, but most of the middle of the season deals with the integration of the tail survivors.

“Lockdown,” though, brings the mysteries of the hatch back into focus, with a little help from “Henry Gale.” Continue reading

Getting Lost: Lighthouse

Ah....good times

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

So, do you think Jack “has what it takes”? Well, I’ve never been one of the many Lost fans who hates Jack. For the first two or three seasons, he was my favorite character on the show, since he often struck me as the only person on the Island who was rational, prudent, and not totally self-involved. Granted, he’s given to frustrating fits of stubbornness, like when he shattered Jacob’s mirror in last night’s episode, as opposed to waiting patiently to see what exactly the mission he and Hurley had been sent on was all about. But more often, Jack has done what it takes to keep survivors alive. It was Jack, after all, who coined “Live Together, Die Alone,” and it was Jack who found the drinking water, and it was Jack who saved Charlie, and it was Jack who helped spring Sawyer and Kate from the Others, etc. He fails just as often as he succeeds, and his failings are more memorable—like in his unyielding but doomed efforts to save Boone in Season One—but he always goes down swinging. This is what makes Jack both tragic and noble. Continue reading

Getting Lost: What Kate Does

It’s time for another installment of “Getting Lost,” where John S takes you through all the salient questions from last night’s episode of Lost:

So, how excited were you for this episode? Ugh. At least this time they put Kate’s name in the title, so I knew going in that this episode would probably be a bust. It continually astounds me that the producers insist on putting Kate episodes at the forefront of seasons and relying on her so heavily. She is possibly the show’s least interesting character, and yet, besides Jack, nobody gets more screen time. Last season, she was the only character to get two flashback episodes; in Season One, she was the only character other than Jack to get three. Continue reading