Posts Tagged ‘Zoolander’

Real World/Road Rules Challenge: Rivals, Week 7 Power Rankings

“I’ve mastered the art of losing right before the final, but now we’re officially in the final.” —Paula

 

“I would have never thought I’d see the day when the only person to really have my back was my worst enemy… but she’s got me.” —Cara Maria

 

Why’s everyone been acting so messed up towards Cara Maria?

Last night was the final female elimination before the final challenge, so everyone was probably a little on edge, but Cara Maria ended up taking the brunt of it.

The episode started with the mob questioning Laurel’s loyalty, given her recent closeness with C.T.* As a result, Kenny/Wes were thinking putting them second in the order for the next the challenge. As Johnny Bananas** put it, “How would you feel if we were fraternizing with the enemy?” But when Cara Maria pointed out that it’s not only Laurel who was doing some treasonous fraternizing, but also Jenn (who seems to be getting more serious about Adam)—well, that kind of evenhanded logic has no place on the Challenge. Rather predictably, Jenn did not react well, but the argument was quickly quelled when Cara Maria agreed to go second. Continue reading

Aught Lang Syne: The Ten Funniest Movies of the Decade

Yesterday we gave you the definitive list of the funniest comedians of the decade. Today, NPI continues its look at the comedy of the Aughts by looking at the ten funniest films of the decade. Evaluating comedies can be tricky. Is the sheer number of laughs more important than the overall quality of the movie? This list aims to balance those concerns: It is a list of the funniest films, and not the best comedies, but at the same time, the best comedy often comes out of a good story. So what is the funniest film of the Aughts? Well, here’s the list:

10. Meet the Parents (2000)

Time has been a little unkind to Meet the Parents. An unfortunate sequel, the overexposure of Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson, and a rather disappointing decade from Robert De Niro all conspired to reflect poorly on this film. These considerations, however, are generally unfair; they ignore the fact that Meet the Parents was one of the Aughts’ first great comedies and that Stiller was one of the best comic actors of the first part of the decade. Meet the Parents showcased his ability to play the understated, slightly belligerent everyman that he would later tone down to a bland, traditional romantic comedy lead. This, combined with De Niro’s excellent and persistent deadpan, led to some truly great comic scenes, like the discussion of “Puff the Magic Dragon” in the car and the lie-detector scene. Continue reading